“When I say my life is not mine, I mean to say that my life is lived through many others, because of many others, by many others, and in lieu of many others. I breathe only because the air moves and because some tree somewhere did not withhold its breath; I stand because the ground […]

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“When the “One” becomes invisible again, this is really not about the loss of monism, but of dualism. The disappearance of dualism is really a condition for the liberation of multitude. Gilles Deleuze has the formula that as soon as dualism vanishes “monism is pluralism.” The same strategy, I think, appears in Loomer’s theopoetic language […]

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Theopoetics guides a literary artist toward contextualizing experience and shepherds the intangibility of experience into art, turning confused isolation into a reach for the communal, all with an eye toward faith, hope, and love — charity in its true sense. It’s this act of making incarnate coupled with the intention of pursuing the divine that […]

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When Poetry Is At Its Best | Art by John McCormick

Many people of faith feel a desire to speak about that which is most precious to them, about that which has transformed their lives, that which they feel has liberated them. Yet that needs to be contrasted with the concern that every time we speak of that source, that place of liberation, we somehow do […]

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What theology needs is more copulation.

What theology needs is more copulation. And postmodern theopoetics may well provide it. The word copulation, of course, denotes coupling: the bringing together and/or union of two things. The related words “copula” and “copulative” are grammatical terms, used to describe the linking of elements in a sentence. How unfortunate, then, that the fertile term copulation […]

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‘Consumed in Grace’ and Theopoetics

Last night I gave a [very] brief introduction to Theopoetics and led a discussion at Valley Mosaic. This was one of the poems I shared in hopes that it would help people gain a better understanding of how to think, write and communicate in a theopoetic manner. Consumed in Grace by Saint Catherine of Siena […]

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Why Poetry Matters

Poets write in the line of prophecy, and their work teaches us how to live. The language of poetry, when properly absorbed, becomes part of our private vocabulary, our way of moving through the world. —Jay Parini, Why Poetry Matters Photo by Céline Clanet.

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Lewis Carroll, Orthodox/Quaker Thought, The Audobon Society, and the Willingness to Squint

An extraordinary presentation by Callid Keefe-Perry at Theology After Google.  The part that really stuck with me was when he quoted Rufus Jones’ Introduction to George Fox’s journal. “…real spiritual life begins when the individual becomes aware of [God].” This really makes me think of the example Peter Rollins uses when speaking about the God […]

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